By 12th May 2017

Further updates about the important changes to the treatment of rental income in Italy mentioned below – the new Airbnb law. Recent legislation (D.L. 50/2017) introduces new rules on tourist rentals, which are defined as those of under 30 days. As of 1st June 2017 there will be an option to have the gross rental income taxed at a fixed rate of 21% under what is known as the “cedolare secca”. No costs are allowed against this income. We should make clear that for those who rent out their property directly, without using online portals or other intermediaries, this is only an option, so there is nothing to prevent you continuing to declare the rentals as you have to date.


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By 3rd May 2017

Once again a lightning move by the Italian government, this time in the field of short-term tourist rentals. The new Draft Law 50/2017 was published in the Official Gazette on 24th April and came into effect the following day. Its proposals are revolutionary: income from all short-term tourist rentals (defined as stays of under 30 days), whether organised directly or through agencies, AirBnB or similar online portals is to be taxed at a flat rate of 21% through the scheme known as cedolare secca.


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By 26th April 2017

Do you rent your house in Italy? There may be some good news for you. For some time there have been incentives available in the form of tax breaks for those renting under certain types of rental contracts, but these were mainly for long-term contracts which had been approved by the tenants’ and landlords’ unions – of limited application to the majority of renters. However deductions are also available for those on lower incomes who are renting their main residence: for those with incomes of less than around €15k, the tax deduction amounts to €495.80, while for those with incomes below €31k, the deduction available is €247.90.


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By 24th March 2017

News comes of an Agenzia request to the Comuni to forward details of all Italian ex-pats who have renounced their residency since 2010 and moved abroad. The Agenzia is keen to establish that despite withdrawing their name from the Anagrafe these persons will still prove to be tax resident in Italy, thus allowing the Agenzia to claim tax from them. Possibly not of immediate interest to non-Italian ex-pats living in Italy, but an indicator that the Agenzia continues to raise its game.


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By 24th March 2017

Alarming news for those paying casual workers under the voucher scheme. For those of you who aren’t aware, the voucher scheme was introduced in 2003 as a less complicated method for paying casual workers. This was invaluable for those running small rental businesses and needing help with cleaning, welcome, gardening etc. However, as seems so often to happen in Italy, the system has been roundly abused –  in the south a furniture-making factory was discovered where the entire workforce were apparently working under the voucher scheme(!)


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By 15th February 2017

The thought of changing your Italian commercialista is a bit like the thought of changing banks. It’s something you’d love to do but you worry that’s it’s terribly complicated or that you’ll miss some vital deadline and land yourself in trouble. And unfortunately, some accountants in Italy prey on just these worries to make sure you stay with them!


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By 15th February 2017

Calling all those owning property in Italy. Have you heard about IMU? This year it replaced the ICI council tax. And the bad news is that while most property owners were exempt from ICI on their first house (prima casa), IMU applies to all properties, prima casa or not. Which means that if you have property in Italy, you need to be paying IMU.


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By 15th February 2017

A note to the very many owners of property in Italy who occasionally rent them out. Following the new agreements between the Agenzia delle Entrate and various Comuni (see our recent article in Latest News) the Comuni have been directed to look particularly closely at those who run B&B or other rental activities in their territory.


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By 15th February 2017

For years Italy has been seen as a place of lazy regulation. Italians seem to pay little attention to their tax obligations and rely on a mixture of over-bureaucracy and lack of interest on the part of those appointed to enforce the law. Non-Italians often see this as one of the many attractive aspects of life in Italy.


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By 15th February 2017

The Italian tax authority is tightening up further on the possibilities of money-laundering and tax evasion. As of 6th December 2011, the limit of cash that can change hands in any transaction was reduced to € 1000. The previous limit was € 2500.


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